Friday, February 4, 2011

This moment- – A Friday ritual. A single photo – no words ....Fri 4th Feb

My Moment-{this moment} – A Friday ritual. A photo – no words – capturing a moment. A simple, special, extraordinary moment.


A moment you want to pause, savour and remember.

“This Moment” is a ritual found on Life inspired by the Wee Man adopted from SouleMama which was introduced to me by Sarah-Jane


And can't resist this photo from inside as we fought off the triffids trying to get in the window-
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16 comments:

alejandro guzman said...

You really need to do some weeding! LOL

Cheers

here's my moment
http://www.raisingamelie.com/2011/02/moments-in-time.html

YogaSavy said...

Those are massive! What do you nourish them with?

Jessica M said...

Looks like a place I wouldn't mind being right about now! (where we have snow up past our knees!)

My moment: http://ascendingthehills.blogspot.com/2011/02/this-weeks-moment-in-time.html

~blessings...I enjoy your blog...I find it really inspiring

Jorie Pacli said...

Oh my! What a struggle it might had been! I do agree with A..:)

Here's my moment: http://jorietravel.blogspot.com

SJ said...

They do look like triffids LOL They are massive, what are they though?

I really like this building, it's so bright and fresh - reminds me I need a holiday.

http://almostthere.biz/2011/02/this-moment-12/

Manzanita said...

Are those Aloe plants? They look like they could be but they are huge. I have one fairly large one in the house and tonight I'm going to prepare some natural medicine with some of the leaves, honey and alcohol. I have 2 books by Father Romano Zago who writes on the healing quality of the aloe plant. I think my plant is fine to use because they should be at least 5 years old.
Manzanita

Jim said...

Not Aloe ( I have those very useful plants also) but Furcrea, similar to yucca. And when they flower, the spike was to the roofline, ablaze with creamy yellow flowers. Then it sets bulbils along the flower spikes, and these drop when large enough to start growing themselves.
So although the furcrea sends up that massive spike, and eventually dies, it has given life to 100's of other plants. Amazing plants.
BTW I think aloe are African, while yucca,furcrea are American originally.

Mary said...

I've never seen a plant like that! Great photo Jim:)

my moment is at http://allergiesandceliac.blogspot.com/

Debra said...

I'd love to see them in bloom. I'll bet they are something to behold... And that house... wow!

Finding One's Way said...

What a landscape Nice Home : )

http://findingonesway.com/2011/02/moment/

Hostel Tinktinkie, Santa Rosa de Calamuchita said...

Hi Jim, what a beautiful plant! Does it flower? I have seen something similar in South Africa but not so big.

My moment: http://www.nelietatravellingadventures.blogspot.com

Manzanita said...

Thanks for the info on the plant Furcrea. It has a very interesting life cycle. I looked it up and it appears to have a lot of friends. I got up before light this morning and cut my aloe leaves for the medicine. Aloes close their pores in the daylight so you harvest them in the dark. My recipe of aloe, honey and alcohol made a blended quart. I'll take one tb before meals for 10 days and see if I turn into a 20 year old. Ha I do know many people who are on this and they swear by it for curing all sorts of diseases.
I live in Montana in the US and we have a short growing season so I keep my aloe indoors.
Take care,
Manzanita

Jim said...

Aloe should be OK indoors as they tend to like filtered sun or shade, unlike most aloes. I'll check your site out for the recipe as I've got a big plant in a shaded area in our courtyard.

Wanda said...

I would love to see these in flower. If they are similar to yucca, they are beautiful, and hard to get rid of!

Zablon said...

are those plants or weeds?

pamanner said...

wow, great pic!