Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Travel Photo Thursday Mar 17. Rangoli: Patterns for Good Fortune.

Painting Rangoli

We loved the colorful designs and graceful swirls of geometric patterns we came across in Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu State, India. Rangoli represent spiritual beliefs or values and are painstakingly drawn in brilliant coloured rice flour on the pavement outside peoples doors where they will ensure good fortune to the home. Each morning they will be redrawn to renew the spiritual energy.
One of the pleasures of travelling India is the sheer exuberance of colour everywhere. I couldn't resist photographing the designs, and also the markets where plentiful supplies of various dyes are available.
Feast your eyes on these photos for my Travel Photo Thursday. And fill your minds with positive energy and good thoughts.
Various Designs







The markets are a blaze of dye supplies.




On Budget Travellers Sandbox, Nancie has a striking photo posted of  The Great Torii (Shinto gate, the sea entrance to Itsukushima Shrine on Miyajima, Japan. A very good composition, stylish, colorful and a tribute to Japan during its dark times of earthquake, tsunami and possible nuclear catastrophe.
I would have liked to have posted something to tribute Japan also, but can only find video and not the photos we took when visiting Osaka for our nephews wedding to a lovely Japanese girl. Our thoughts are with them and all our Japanese friends.

I felt the best I could do was to post these Rangoli photos to wish all Japanese good fortune.


Share/Bookmark

19 comments:

YogaSavy said...

Rangoli is designed during house warming, diwali and other celebrations. I do enjoy getting my hands in color and designing..

Jim said...

I can understand that Yogasavy. Just loved watching the older kids drawing the patterns. I photographed many of them. They sure do brighten up the pavements.
Am I right in thinking they are expected to wash/wear away so new life can be encouraged by redoing them next day?

RuykyuMike said...

Jim,
Another well-presented travel post, in colors, capture and caption. Thanks for sharing.

Mary said...

Jim, your site always enlightens me and touches me deep in my soul! Your photos are always filled with a 1000 words:)

Evan said...

I really like the picture of the dye seller in the market. The colors are wonderful.

Roy Durham said...

top o the morning Jim love the colors and the art.
i have a little art for you to see just a short trip from me to you.http://royd-spiltmilk.blogspot.com/2011/03/lot-be-leprechaun.html and happy st patty's day god bless

Leigh said...

I learned something new today and what a wonderful way to wish the Japanese good fortune. In Vancouver there is a very good Indian restaurant called Rangoli - so I won't forget the name either.
I love the photos showing the diversity of dye colours.

Muza-chan said...

I love the vivid colors in your shots.

Jim said...

Hi Mike, yeah the colours aren't too bad for my old Sony Cybershot which captured colour so well. Since replaced tha camera as it was only shooting at 2 megapixels.

Thanks for the comments Mary and yes those photos say a lot.
Hi Evan , thanks for popping in. The guy is holding up a pukeko stuffed toy we took on holiday with us from my wife's playcentre. A well travelled toy.

Hi Roy, will certainly check that out. I've been tied up with Blog4NZ campaign so been a bit quiet over with your group.

Yes Leigh, I felt the Rangoli symbols offered good fortune. And the colours represented hope for everyone to come through their situation.

Hi Muza chan, got to check out your Travel Photo Thursday also. It will probably be as good as it always is.
Thanks for popping in everyone. Good fortune to you all.

Bret Love said...

Beautiful photos, Jim! India is one of my dream destinations...

Kerry-Ann said...

Love the vibrant colours of the market. Colours can make even the dullest place look cozy. And in this time of darkness in Japan, colours mean hope. Just like the beautiful art that is about creating new life.

Cathy Sweeney said...

Beautiful photos and message.

Nancie said...

Beautiful shots Jim! The colors are amazing.

Thanks for posting to Travel Photo Thursday!

thepinaysolobackpacker said...

really love the colors, style and the arts in India. I have tickets for Oct, I;m getting more excited now with your photos and story! :)
thnx for sharing!

Jorie Pacli said...

This is really pretty Jim! I love art in any way and admire every form of it and this one just made me crave to go to India one day...Thanks for sharing;) I was unable to join this week but I was intrigued by your photo so here I am...

sheril benedict said...

thx jim for this post ..cos i m from pondicherry ..ya Rangoli looks great during the festival time ..but everyday they ll put the normal one ..actually its has a big history.In olden day kolam used to be drawn in coarse rice flour which invites ants,birds and other small one ..into home everyday ..for more detail about kolam history check this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kolam

Jim said...

Thanks everyone.

And Sheril, these photos were taken 5 days after the Boxing Day tsunami swept through the coast of Tamil Nadu. So are very appropriate to wishing good fortune on tsunami survivors in Japan, because you have all suffered the same disaster. But they represent hope. It was my way of offering hope for all who have been affected. And Pondicherry has a special place in our hearts because of what we witnessed- even though the tsunami was so recent, Indian people were out on the streets repainting their Rangoli.
We thought that to be so inspiring.

lakwatsera de primera said...

interesting patterns and vibrant colors, you captured well the sheer exuberance of India :)

Susan Deborah said...

Wow! Jim, this is from home. I see them everyday. This is called kolam in Tamil. The word 'kolam' is from the word 'kalam' which means space. Kolam has great significance in Tamil culture. It is to ward off evil spirits and it also ecological as the white lines are made of rice flour which ants feed on. Well, my two bits on kolam or rangoli.

Cheers.

Joy always,
Susan